Jacky Granges of Domaine de Beudon
Jacky Granges of Domaine de Beudon

Jacky Granges of Domaine de Beudon

Just last week we brought in two deliciously obscure wines from a tiny Swiss producer in Valais, which the importer alleges is accessible only by a dangerous-looking alpine gondola. Unfortunately, as I reached out for more information about these wines, I was alarmed to hear that Jacky Granges, the grower and winemaker who took over in 1971 and developed the vineyards to be fully biodynamic by 1992, had passed away in the short time between tasting his wines and their arrival at the shop.
Tragedy, however, makes them no less interesting or delicious. Instead, perhaps we can look on the brighter side and consider the liveliness of his wines as an opportunity to experience a small sliver of existence upon the mountaintop parcels of Domaine de Beudon, rife with medicinal herbs, livestock, and onsite hydroelectric power to create an oasis of grape-friendly agriculture.

Domaine de Beudon

Domaine de Beudon

The Wines

The notable absence of wooden barrels at Domaine de Beudon belied a depth of flavor and fine tannin that I usually associate with cold-climate, thin-skinned grapes like Pinot Noir and Gamay which comprise the majority of 2007 Vielles Vignes “Constellation” Valias Rouge. In addition, a small amount of Diolinor (an indigenous variety) is blended with the wine to give the bright bing-cherry flavors a bit more density. With the bottle age, indigenous yeast vinification, and cool, slow fermentation of grapes grown on granitic soil, a tough, rusty-ness holds the wine to the earth while the complex aromas slowly rise from the glass.

Similarly, the 2009 “Schiller” Valais Rose, which substitutes indigenous Fendant for the Diolinoir of the rouge, opens with a rich iron-like aroma, and continues through the palate with excellent acidity and fresh Rainier-cherry fruit intensity. Where the rouge is centered and earth-bound, the rose feels like a creaking swing set with enough lift and gravity to consider a full loop around.

Up and down with a tension born of high-altitude natural farming, the wines of Domaine de Beudon are excellent, but limited. We are fortunate to have these examples of artisan winemaking in our shop, and oh how far to slake this sacred thirst.

Edmunds St. John - Bone Jolly Rose
Edmunds St. John - Bone Jolly Rose

Edmunds St. John – Bone Jolly Rose

Edmunds St. John Bone-Jolly Rosé

Featured in The New York Times

Congrats to local winemaker, Steve Edmunds for his recent accolades in the NYT article “20 Wines for Under $20: Spring Edition”.  We are big fans of this excellent Gamay Rosé currently on our shelf for $23.00

“The wine stores tell us it’s rosé season (though in my opinion, it’s never not rosé season). Here is an old favorite, which year after year offers the vivacity characteristic of a good young rosé. It’s made entirely of Gamay Noir, the grape of Beaujolais (hence the somewhat awkward name Bone-Jolly), and it’s exactly what you want on those first few days out on the deck, the balcony or wherever you can grab space in the open air.” – NYT

Eric Asimov’s article in The New York Times this week, “12 Everyday Bottles for Wine Lovers”, is a savvy list of versatile, food-friendly wines you should keep stocked around at all times. Paul Marcus Wines currently is carrying several of these producers and types of wine recommended, including the following: 2010 Selbach Oster Zeltinger Schlossberg Riesling Kabinett $26 2013 Merkelbach Ürziger Würzgarten Riesling Spätlese $24  2013 Bründlmayer Kamptaler Terrassen Riesling $27 2013 Bründlmayer Kamptaler Terrassen Gruner Veltliner $25 2012 Felsina Chianti Classico $24 Enjoy!

Have you seen our Spanish neighbors lately? Nah, I think they got tired of our late night shenanigans and moved across the bay.

Roses at Paul Marcus WinesThis time of year here at Paul Marcus Wines we are down right Rosé crazy! We live, breath and well uh.. drink the drink the stuff like it is going out of style. And if being fanatical about Rosé is wrong, then we don’t wanna be right. There is something about the crisp and refreshing nature of Rosé wine, not to mention it’s hugely versatile food pairing capability, that makes us all warm and fuzzy like a troop of giddy schoolgirls.

And just when we thought our passion for pink couldn’t get any stronger, we’ve gone and outdid ourselves. Currently PMW offers nearly 50 Rosés from countless appellations all over the world! A grand parcel of prime real estate in the front of the store is and  will be dedicated to Rosé mania throughout the summer. It’s a thing of sheer beauty.

More Roses at Paul Marcus Wines

It’s a constant game of Tetris trying to make room for all the great Rosé we taste. Just recently this plethora of pink pleasure packed pests decided to play not so nice in the sandbox, essentially banishing their long time neighbor Spanish whites, to an entirely different section!

Now you may be asking yourself a question asked by many of our customers. Isn’t the Rosé category way out of style and aren’t they all sweet and of questionable quality? You are not alone in this realm of thinking. Even though delicious dry and high quality Rosé has pretty much always been produced, it is unfortunately in most peoples minds been lumped into the same category as your Mother’s Mateus and your Grandmother’s White Zinfandel. And when you think about it it’s not all that surprising. Beringer, a well known mammoth of a winery from California, practically made their entire fortune by churning out over one hundred thousand cases a year of their affordable sweet blush. It’s been burned into the masses minds that Rosé can’t be anything but the sweet plonk of days past.

Somebody drinks this stuff, right?

Somebody drinks this stuff, right?

Blush makes you beautiful, doesn't it?

Blush makes you beautiful, doesn’t it?

Fortunately PMW has unbelievable access to the finest wines in the world. We are clobbered every Spring with a multitude of hand crafted Rosés made by producers who seek to fortify the reputation of Rosé as a world class wine that should always be considered when you are making your selection for your Friday night party or better yet Saturday barbecue. We wouldn’t be doing right by these hard working pink wine artisans if we didn’t succeed in spreading our undying love for Rosé. So there we are, constantly urging our patrons to “think pink” and witnessing ridiculous amounts of Rosé walk out our very door every single day. We are proud knowing that bone dry and highly satiating Rosé is being prominently featured all over the globe on wine lists and retail establishments.

I suppose we would be leaving a stone unturned if we weren’t to explain just why we are so damn excited about this particular wine category.

Rosé wine is basically a pink potion made by bleeding or pressing juice from red grapes (the color comes from the contact with the grape skins) or by blending portions of red wine and white wine together. It’s a process that can coax some of the most delicate and pretty aromatics possible from nearly any variety of black-skinned grapes.  So what does this mean in terms of the flavor of the wine and it’s practical application? Well in a nutshell, you kinda are able to get the best of both worlds! You can attain the fresh and bright acid driven character of great white wine plus the highly desirable red fruit and secondary flavor characteristics of great red wine. You can even impart phenolic content to the wine. Yes, Rosé can have tannin too!

Because of this harmony of red and white wine attributes, Rosé can go beautifully with many foods that most might only pair with either a red or a white wine. Their generous fruit and staunch acidities make them matchable with a vast array of dishes. Have you ever been out to dinner at a nice restaurant and everyone at the table orders drastically different dishes, and the host is struggling to choose a wine that can fill the tall order of being tasty with Chicken Caeser Salad, Seared Rare Tuna and Grilled Ribeye. Rosé, along with Riesling and Champagne by the way, might be their huckleberry!

And whats more is that Rosé is made in a wide variety of different weights, from lighter bodied quaffable styles to full bodied deeply textured styles. This means that while Rosé can obviously be sipped at your fourth of July barbecue it can also be enjoyed in front of a cozy fire in the dead of winter, in other words all year round. Any season is Rose season here at PMW and no matter what time of year we always have some tasty pink wine on deck.

The last and certainly not least reason why we love drinking Rosé so much is because, its just so damn easy to drink. After a long day of tasting red wine being hit over the head with heavy, extracted, or tannic wines, Rosé seems perfect cleanse the palate and take our minds off the daunting task of deciding which of the ten Pinot Noirs we tasted are worthy enough to be featured in our humble store.  The same way many use a cold beer to relax after a hard day at work.

If our passion for pink wine isn’t obvious by now, we encourage you to come on down to the shop and see for yourself how dedicated we have been to putting bottles of Rosé into our customers hands for decades.

With that in mind we would like to give you a peak at what Rosés we have been especially excited about lately. We’ll have you know that this is just a mere glimpse of what we offer and theres plenty more where that come from.

Have you seen our Spanish neighbors lately? Nah, I think they got tired of our late night shenanigans and moved across the bay.

Have you seen our Spanish neighbors lately? Nah, I think they got tired of our late night shenanigans and moved across the bay.

Arnot-Roberts Touriga Nacional Rosé-California $27 
“New wave pioneer Arnot-Roberts strikes again with this delicious Rosé made from Touriga Nacional and a splash of Tinta Cao, grown in the rocky and volcanic soils in Clear Lake. The nose shows fresh strawberry and blood orange, while the palate is bright with great acid and a savory saline finish. Very limited production.”

Division Pinot Noir Rosé- Willamette Valley, Oregon $24
“The wine is showing floral and spice nose with savory and wild strawberry aspects. The palate mineral rich, like wet rock, and intense in strawberry and Rainier cherry. The wine is light and crisp and has an intense wild pink salmon color. Out of the gates and drinking very well, but will likely evolve coming months and gain in complexity.”  190 cases made.

Domaine Collote Pinot Noir Rosé- Marsannay, France $21
“As soon as the grapes arrive at the cuverie, they are pressed, then fermentation and “élevage” is in stainless steel in order to keep all the fruit of this wine and preserve its freshness and youth. The Marsannay Rosé, soft and fruity, is backed with good strength and liveliness.  It rosé color has red currant hues. The aroma evokes freshly harvested fruit and  peaches.”

Domaine du Bagnol Grenache, Mourvedre, and Cinsault Rosé- Cassis, France $29
“The Rosé is produced from several parcels that comprise slightly less than 7 hectares of vineyards.  The vineyards are clay and limestone, situated on a gentle slope with a north – northwest exposure.  The blend is Grenache (55%), Mourvedre (31%) and Cinsault (14%).  Production tops out at about 40,000 bottles per annum; approximately 6000 bottles are allocated to the US market.”

Ameztoi Rosado di Hondurabbi Beltza- Getariako Txakolina, Spain $22
“The pink sibling of Ameztoi’s flagship white, this vibrant rosé is made from a mix of red and white indigenous grapes and is bottled with a little residual carbon to give it a light spritz. Fermented in stainless steel. Candied red fruits combine with a lime infused edge makes this a wildly intriguing rosé. The bottle will not last long!”

Graci Rosato di Norello Mascallese- Etna, Italy $20 
“Vessel cement tanks, no malolactic fermentation. Five months of contact with fine lees, natural filtration. One month in bottle before release. Pale salmon pink. Very elegant and understated, with pretty red whole berries Palate: Harmonious and sublime, exquisitely balanced throughout. Ripe berried and saline finish.”

Please remember we offer 10% off any twelve bottles of wine. This can save you some coin when you are putting together a case of Rosé for your next weekend event.

Cheers and thank you to our loyal patrons.

Thanksgiving Wines

Thanksgiving WinesThis Thanksgiving, we took the guesswork out of wine shopping for you and created a special section filled with some of our favorite bottles. Whatever your palate or price point, your turkey is sure to be in good company with any of these wines.

We have plenty more recommendations that we couldn’t fit on the shelf–feel free to ask us for a personalized pairing!

Sparkling:

N/V Gaston Chiquet Tradition Champagne, $50
A classic Champagne with rich, toasty flavors balanced by lively acidity
N/V Ettore Germano Sparkling Nebbiolo Rose ‘Rosanna,’ $35
Unique, gorgeously hued, and brimming with elegant red fruit flavors
N/V Paltrinieri Lambrusco di Sorbara Rose, $13.99
Delicious and easy with tart rhubarb and strawberry notes–great with cranberry sauce!

White:

2013 Donnhoff Riesling, $25
Aromatic with great acidity, lots of stone fruit, and a hint of smoke
2011 Chateau de Puligny-Montrachet Clos du Chateau, $29
An excellent value in white Burgundy, with great precision and minerality and tart green apple flavors

Red:

2012 Valle Dell’Acate Il Frappato, $19
Light, bright, and refreshing, with tasty strawberry notes
2011 Hofgut Falkenstein Spatburgunder Spatlese Trocken, $22
Fantastic light-bodied German Pinot Noir with intriguing earthy and herbal character
2012 Jane et Sylvain Bourgogne, $30
Killer red Burgundy with classic Pinot Noir red fruit and mouthwatering acidity and minerality
2013 Yann Bertrand Fleurie, $24
One of our favorite wines of the year–light, aromatic, and bursting with great Beaujolais flavor
2103 Succés Vinicola Cuca de Lllum, $17
An unusual, vibrant, and delicious natural Trepat from Catalunya that’s almost too easy to drink
2013 Julien Sunier Reigne, $27
Complex and serious Beaujolais with juicy fruit and a touch of spice
2011 Camus-Bruchon Savigny-Narbantons Premier Cru, $40
Excellent balanced and complex old-vine Burgundy
2011 Domaine de la Cote Pinot Noir Santa Rita Hills, $45
Seductive, aromatic medium-weight California Pinot Noir
2010 Domaine Dominique Gallois Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru, $90
Impeccable balance, clearly articulated flavors and great precision–quintessential Gevrey-Chambertin.

Few grape varieties divide the wine-drinking masses more than Pinot Grigio. The fact that it has been constantly struggling with a very public identity crisis benefits neither vine nor consumer. Not actually its own distinct variety, Pinot Grigio, like Pinot Blanc, is actually a color mutation of the much more universally beloved Pinot Noir. If Pinot Noir is a high-maintenance but friendly beauty who strives for perfection in all she does, Pinot Grigio is known as her plain, timid little sister who tiptoes through life trying her best not to get on anyone’s bad side. To make matters worse, she must follow in the footsteps of her earlier-born twin sister, the more sophisticated and worldly Pinot Gris. Despite all odds, however, Pinot Grigio managed in the early twenty-first century to find an accepting table in the lunchroom, where she has enjoyed popularity among an affable crowd ever since.

To understand Pinot Grigio, we must first understand its provenance. New grape varieties can come into existence in a number of ways–two existing varieties may be bred in a nursery, or cross-pollinated in the vineyard, or, sometimes, a new vine will turn out to have slight differences from its parent plant. If the vine grower finds the traits of the new plant to be desirable, he or she might take a cutting to propagate new, similar plants with the same characteristics, known as clones. With more than 1,000 registered clones, Pinot Noir is often considered to be a highly genetically unstable grape variety, but a more likely explanation for its clonal diversity is its ancient status. In existence for around 2,000 years, this grape variety has had more time than most to branch out and experiment. Pinot Gris made its first appearance some time around the early 1700s, popping up separately in Germany and France within just a year of one another. It finally found its way to Italy at the beginning of the nineteenth century, where it changed its name to Pinot Grigio and reinvented its personality.

Today, the Gris/Grigio divide can be a bit confusing. While they are indeed the same grape, they tend to present themselves quite differently. In France, Pinot Gris is at its best in Alsace, where it takes on the luscious character of ripe peaches and apricots, often with a hint of smoke, developing rich, biscuity flavors with age. However, as Pinot Grigio in north-eastern Italy’s Veneto region, the greatest achievement of these fresh and lightly fruity wines is being voted “least likely to offend.” Seriously: a Google search for the phrase “Pinot Grigio” yields 9,400,000 results, while the phrase “Pinot Grigio inoffensive” turns up 9,300,000. But how can a grape whose best attribute appears to be neutrality garner such praise in France, Germany, and Oregon as Pinot Gris? (It is worth noting that in the new world, lighter, more commercial, and inexpensive styles of this wine are typically labeled as ‘Pinot Grigio,” while the more serious, flavorful bottlings boast the name ‘Pinot Gris.”)

With certain practices in the vineyard and cellar, the Pinot Grigio grape can indeed produce wines worthy of higher praise than “inoffensive.” If acidity is preserved and yields as well as sugar levels are kept to a minimum, varietal character is given the chance to shine. Because the name “Pinot Grigio” alone is enough to sell wine to the general populace, most is produced by big companies that don’t feel the need to try very hard–hence the reputation. But with a bit of care and attention, the Italians are quite capable of coaxing bright and even complex flavors from the much-maligned grape. The region of Alto Adige does this with the most consistency, although some exciting examples are now coming out of Friuli Venezie-Giulia–Pinot Grigio’s best-known home–as well.

One of the best Friulian Pinot Grigios we have discovered is made by a winery called Scarpetta, owned and operated by Bobby Stuckey, M.S. and Chef Lachlan Patterson, the owners and masterminds behind James Beard Award-winning restaurant Frasca Food and Wine in Boulder, Colorado. Scarpetta’s wines are created to complement the Friuli-inspired cuisine of the restaurant, and they achieve this mission well. The Pinot Grigio, surprisingly, is the standout in their lineup, which also includes a Sauvignon Blanc, a Friulano, a Barbera, and a sparkling Rosé. Planting vines in cooler sites accounts for impressive balance of acidity and alcohol, and a brief period of skin-contact followed by six months of lees aging lends body and texture atypical of the often watery beverage.

On the nose and palate, this wine is anything but bland, with aromas of white flowers, peach, apricot, and hints of minerality. Dry and crisp, with just the right amount of acidity, flavors of stone fruits, lavender, honey, lime, melon, pear, white flowers, and minerals make this Pinot Grigio perfect to drink on its own: refreshing, but never boring. Naturally, a wine created by restaurateurs is going to make for some great food pairings as well–try it with proscuitto, sashimi, and lighter dishes based on chicken, fish, and pork.

To all of the Pinot Grigio nay-sayers out there: we suggest you give Scarpetta a try. And for the already initiated, this will be an easy way to step up your wine game and see what this oft-underachieving grape is capable of at its best. If you’ve spent your life shunning Pinot Grigio, make a space at your lunch (or dinner) table. You just might find that you’ve been a bit judgmental without really getting to know her.

2012 Scarpetta Pinot Grigio Delle Venezie IGT, $16

Mother's Day Wines

Mother's Day WinesCrafting a great bottle of wine can be quite similar to raising a family. From shielding sensitive young grapes in the vineyard from pests and disease to controlling unruly fermentations in the cellar, certain winemakers already know that the process of growing up depends on both nature and nurture. This Mother’s Day, celebrate the mothers in your life with a glass of wine made lovingly by a winemaker who is also a mother.

All wines listed are 15% off now through Sunday, May 11th,

FEATURED WINEMAKERS
and wines available at PMW:
Cathy Corison
Corison Winery
Napa Valley, California
*Winery offering free tastings for mothers this Sunday!
1998 Corison Kronos Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, $150
2003 Corison Kronos Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, Napa Valley, $135

Elisabetta Foradori
Azienda Agricola Elisabetta Foradori
Trentino, Italy
2010 Foradori Teroldego, Trentino, Italy, $27

Vanessa Wong
Peay Vineyards
Sonoma Coast, California
2010 Peay Pomarium Estate Pinot Noir, Sonoma Coast, $59

Heidi Schrock
Weinbauerin Heidi Schrock
Neusiedlersee-Hugelland, Austria
2010 Heidi Schrock Weissburgunder, $28

Milla Handley
Handley Cellars
Anderson Valley, California
2012 Handley Estate Vineyard Chardonnay, Anderson Valley, $23

Tracey Brandt
Donkey & Goat
Berkeley, California
2011 Donkey & Goat Syrah, Fenaughty Vineyard, El Dorado, $36
2012 Donkey & Goat ‘Five Thirteen’ Red Wine Blend, El Dorado, $31
2013 Donkey & Goat Sparkling Chardonnay ‘Lily’s Cuvée,’ Anderson Valley, $30

Laura Brunelli
Gianni Brunelli Le Chiuse
Montalcino, Italy2004 Gianni Brunelli Brunello di Montalcino, $68
2010 Gianni Brunelli Rosso di Montalcino, $30

Clelia Romano
Colli di Lapio Romano Clelia
Campania, Italy
2011 Colli di Lapio Romano Clelia, Greco di Tufo ‘Alexandros,’ Campania, Italy, $28
2012 Colli di Lapio Romano Clelia Fiano di Avellino, Campania, Italy, $30

Christina Saahs
Nikolaihof
Wachau, Austria
2012 Nikolaihof Grüner Veltliner ‘Hefeabzug,’ Wachau, Austria, $31